In many applications, biological drinking water treatment can offer an affordable, green treatment approach alternative to conventional methods and meet the industry’s growing demand for reliable, effective and sustainable treatment techniques

By Kerry Meyer, P.E., Process and Design Engineer and Bill Bellamy, P.E. Senior Vice President and Fellow, CH2M HILL Global Water Business Group

Kerry Meyer and Bill Bellamy will present their paper “Biological Treatment Performance Under Contaminant & Hydraulic Loading Rate Swings” on Tuesday, June 11 at 3:00 p.m., during the American Water Works Association’s Annual Conference and Exposition (ACE 13), in Denver, Colorado. Learn more about CH2M HILL’s ACE 13 2013 participation and technical sessions.

Biological drinking water treatment is gaining more attention in the water treatment community as a result of increased focus on affordable “green” treatment approaches and technologies capable of contaminant destruction. This is an alternative to contaminant concentration or generation of a brine stream typical of reverse osmosis or ion exchange, which often results in high, ongoing operations and maintenance costs. As first-use raw water supplies continue to become more limited, the challenge of producing high-quality, reliable finished water has become even more complex and is compounded by the fact that utility capital improvement project budgets are shrinking. In many applications, biological drinking water treatment can offer an affordable, green treatment approach alternative to conventional methods and meet the industry’s growing demand for reliable, effective and sustainable treatment techniques.

As research in biological drinking water treatment continues to grow, the more biological drinking water treatment design and implementation strategies have garnered increasing attention. One of the key considerations in evaluating biological drinking water treatment is determining how quickly the unit process can respond to system changes. What happens to a drinking water biofilter when filter feed water taste and odor compounds quickly increase from 10 ng/L to 100 ng/L? Does the mass of contaminant removed increase? What happens if plant demand increases and the filter loading rate increases 25 percent? Does the percent of biodegradable organic carbon removed decrease?

Our presentation characterizes the performance of pilot and full-scale biological processes under dynamic operating conditions. This presentation is being delivered as part of the special topics session entitled “Finding the Edges of Biological Treatment” developed by the American Water Works Association Biological Drinking Water Treatment Committee. The purpose of the six presentation session is to explore the latest developments in biotreatment technology, operations and monitoring strategies.

Ms. Meyer has more than 10 years of consulting and academic experience in water and wastewater treatment design, operation and master planning projects. She has specialized experience in drinking water biofiltration for taste and odor removal, biological denitrification, pilot and bench-scale testing, planning, pre-design, and final design. She is a past Chair of the American Water Works Association Biological Drinking Water Treatment Committee.

Dr. Bellamy has more than 31 years of experience managing and participating in more than 150 water, wastewater, and reuse treatment plant evaluations, designs, construction, and operations. He is an internationally recognized expert in water supply and treatment and has developed innovative applications for conventional, disinfection and advanced treatment including membranes, biological filtration, UV, ozone, chlorine dioxide, high rate clarification, and filtration technologies. Mr. Bellamy is supervising more than 50 research projects including more than 30 pilot facilities for clients in the U.S. and overseas.